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speculation, as science and technology converge, ground-breaking developments in medicine continue to emerge. cramer's zeroing in on one biotech speck that could be on the verge of a major move. all coming up on "mad money." >>> don't miss a second of "mad money." got @jimcramer on twitter. have a question? tweet cramer at #madtweets. send an e-mail to madmoney@cnbc.com or give us a call at 1-800-743-cnbc. miss something? head to madmoney.cnbc.com. when you take a closer look... ...at the best schools in the world... ...you see they all have something very interesting in common. they have teachers... ...with a deeper knowledge of their subjects. as a result, their students achieve at a higher level. let's develop more stars in education. let's invest in our teachers... ...so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. on gasoline. i am probably going to the gas station about once a month. last time i was at a gas station was about...i would say... two months ago. i very rarely put gas in my chevy volt. i go to the gas station such a small amount that i forget how to put gas in my car. [
of sandstorm gold is next. >>> later, smart speculation, as science and technology converge, ground-breaking developments in medicine continue to emerge. cramer's zeroing in on one biotech spec that could be on the verge of a major move. all coming up on "mad money." >>> don't miss a second of "mad money." got @jimcramer on twitter. have a question? tweet cramer at #madtweets. send an e-mail to madmoney@cnbc.com or give us a call at 1-800-743-cnbc. miss something? head to madmoney.cnbc.com. [singing] hoveround takes me where i wanna go... where will it send me... one call to hoveround and you'll be singing too! pick up the phone and call hoveround, the premier power chair. hoveround makes it easier than any other power chair. hoveround is more maneuverable to get you through the tightest doors and hallways. more reliable. hoveround employees build your chair, deliver your chair, and will service your chair for as long as you own your chair. most importantly, 9 out of 10 people got their hoveround for little or no cost. call now for your free dvd and information kit. you don't really
science to believe that the president was disappointed in the expectations he has for himself. but look, i think part of that was because as i said earlier, we met a new mitt romney, we met a mitt romney that wanted to walk away from the central theory of his economic plan, which was his tax cut. i don't have a tax plan that is 4.8 trillion, i am not going to cut taxes on the rich. i don't have a voucher plan, i love teachers, i think we need more of them. don't believe me, speaker gingrich was eloquent in the primaries, saying that mitt romney will say absolutely anything to get elected. >> the president had 90 minutes, now, if he had done his homework and prepared, if he had actually studied romney, why didn't he say it? virtually every analyst has said, and even your deputy campaign manager has said the charges -- was made wrong. forgetting that for a second, the job of the president is supposed to be able to be competent and to stand up for what he believes in and articulate what is wrong. mitt romney walked over him. >> and alex, you mentioned the president is air born to the golden s
baby. >> doing math with the gets? >> doing s.t.e.avenue. m. >> science, technology, engineering, art and math. >> hey, do you do "gangnam style." >> what does that mean? >> gangnam sfooil? >> psy. the horse dance. >> the horse dance. >> you got it. >> like that. >> there we go. >> oh, yeah. oh, yeah. ♪ >> almost as good as david gregory. >> you name, it elmo can do it. >> there we go. >> that was fantastic. >> let's talk about -- did you read the "new york times." >> yeah, "new york times." there's an article that the word really is overused. >> really? >> really. >> really. >> a whole article devoted to, that really? >> really. >> it used to be kind of like that's surprising, but now it's that snarky really? >> really. >> really. >> it has been overused. by the writers and shows to make that kind of funny turn. it has been a little overused. what are some other -- i'm actually thinking of like, you know, like. >> like, and, you know, i'm a complete offender. >> seriously. >> serious ly. >> really? >> what words are overused? >> elmo loves overusing love. >> oh. >> you can't overus
saying the therapies have quote, no basis in science or medicine. >>> a devastating new attack in afghanistan to talk about today. a suicide bomber killed 14 people including three american soldiers in the volatile eastern province of khost. it comes a day after the death toll in the 11-year-old war in afghanistan reached 2,000. but that number does not include the number of americans injured in afghanistan and who died when they were transferred elsewhere. which would then raise the total to over 2100. nbc news has special coverage today across the middle east. lester holt joins us live now at the afghan capital of kabul. that number 2,000 representing only americans who died in afghanistan not those who were injured in the country. but didn't die until they were transported wrels. that's a big distinction. this is a major marker to reach now with the number of casualties. >> it is. and we've been talking about a number over 2100 for some time. 2,000 representing those who died here. but remember the aeromedical system is such a soldier could be wounded on the battlefield and
who won't get out of bed have science on their side showing mela tonin affects teenagers later at night and because they need nine hours of sleep teens have a tougher time getting up in the morning. schools across the nation experimenting with starting school later in the mornings based on these findings. >> and there is a brave woman with no problem telling a black bear who is really in charge. take a look. >> this unwelcome visitor left after the lady comes out and shows him who is boss. she just shouted at the bear who scurried away this, is not the first time he had to deal with a bear on the deck. so she's not worried. and the user who posted this video... take a look. >> wow. >> and the user posted this video has a series on bear encounters. >> and there is a huge week ahead in the bay area including fleet week. >> and first, jail breaking an iphone illegal? we'll take a look and charges on a pg&e bill. >> and there is a masked man forces police to evacuate part of downtown san mateo. the man explains how it was just a misunderstanding. >> a killer virus researchers looki
with the right skills here at home. nevada, i wanted, recruit thousands of new math and science teachers, improve early education, create 2 million more slots in community colleges so that workers can get trained for the new jobs out there now. help us work with colleges and universities to keep tuition down. that is a goal we can meet together. you cannot choose that future for america -- can choose that future for america, but what we need to do? >> vote. >> i have already worked with republicans and democrats to cut spending by $1 trillion. i'm willing to do a little bit more. i want to reform our tax code so that idea is simple and fair. but i also want to ask the wealthiest households in america to pay slightly higher taxes. that is the same rate we had when bill clinton was president and we created 23 million new jobs, the biggest surplus in history, and a whole lot of millionaires to boot. [applause] so that is my plan. in fairness, my opponent has got a plan, too. there's only one problem. some of you heard bill clinton say that there is no or arithmetic in it. [laughter] they think that
and making fun of each other while we are in the science fair together. >> together they applied their skills to find ways to save their school districts tens of thousands of colors in energy costs. something the las of 1936 never had to worry about. >> it's baby steps you have to take to lead to a big difference. it's what you have to do. every light switch counts. >> for example, this lamp is an older system. it's about one and a half inches in diameter and uses more energy than newer models. >> their cool, they know it best, and they can help us out with specific counts and specific information. the project was made 'baseball pg&e innovator pilot program wherein saytors like duane are brought on board to do an energy audit. in this case he was teamed with those who know the campus best, the members of the green engineering academy. >> that measure we identified was about 100,000kwh of annual savings which i think is $14,000 for the school each year that they would save. >> the students were able to identify more than 45 quad lamps, multiple thermostats and old computers that were outdated
straightforward guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> at least 30 people are dead across iraq. the muslim community seems to be part the. >> baghdad's shiite dominated government blames the recent attacks on sunni insurgents with al qaeda ties. two americans, one civilian are dead. it happened at a temporary checkpoint 0er79ed by coalition troops west of kabul. three afghan soldiers also died in the clash that officials say may have been provoked by insurgent fire. there has been a rise of militant suicide attacks. suicide attacks are a common tactic for the taliban. in an exclusive interview with cnn, anna koren talks to a would-be suicide bomber. >> this man believed he was carrying out god's will when he carried out an attack in kandahar province. he said he agreed to wear a suicide vest and kill as many people as possible. it's a special feeling that comes to you when you are ready for a suicide attack. no one can stop you, no one could stop me, that is except the law. when police arrested
. >>shepard: doctor, never thought about that one. >> that's science for you. >>shepard: everything will be harmful soon. thank you, doctor. >> the man behind brian griffin will host the biggest event in all of hollywood, and now a new gig hosting the oscars. [ man ] ring ring... progresso this reduced sodium soup says it mahelp lower cholesterol, how does it work? you just he to eat it as part of your heart healthy diet. step 1. eat the soup. all those veggies and beans, that's what may help lower your cholesterol and -- well that's easy [ male announcer ] progresso. you gotta taste this soup. i've got a nice long life ahead. big plans. so when i found out medicare doesn't pay all my medical expenses, i got a medicare supplement insurance plan. [ male announcer ] if you're eligible for medicare, you may know it only covers about 80% of your part b medical expenses. the rest is up to you. call and find out about an aarp medicare supplement insurance plan, insured by unitedhealthcare insurance company. like all standardized medicare supplement plans, it could save you thousands in ou
guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. [ ♪ music ♪ ] >> cenk: who do you think the larger force in america, the democratic party? the republican party? or independent? really, if you guessed independents you're right. look at this chart since 1990 independents are winning. they used to be lower than democrats and republicans until 1990 but then they take off and as you see they're at the end they're starting to pull away. that's 43% number for the republicans is wrong. independents actually higher than both republicans and democrats. okay so obviously the independents since they're so strong they're representing the upcoming presidential debates right? wrong. they're not represented at all. here is gary johnson from the libertarian party. we'll talk to him on the show. he's not there. and then rocky anderson from the justice party. a man who is actually progressive. the man who used to be mayor of salt lake city and the man who joins us now. rocky, i want to ask you about progressives
his fake science theory about pregnancy and rape, he has also described his opponent, unladylike. they released video of him for spending time in jail and he is defending his vote against fair pay for women, not by saying that women don't suffer in terms of pay discrimination, but by saying instead that he just doesn't believe that discrimination is wrong. he doesn't believe that businesses should have to follow any laws about who they discriminate against. the government shouldn't tell you what you pay and what you don't pay. discrimination is just freedom for business owners who are getting a really good deal on their lady workers. republicans have to weigh how badly they want a republican candidate snar for missouri. they have to weigh that against how much it's going to cost them to be associated with the le jat mitt rape, your unladylike jailed abortion protesters i'm against civil rights guy in missouri. now he says that businesses should be able to discriminate in what t
in fields from medicine to science, art, and journalism. recipients don't often know they've been nominated until they find out they are winners. >>> one of the winners of the award almost missed the chance to accept. mann m mandolin player chris thiel repeatedly ignored calls from the macarthur foundation. he thought they were election year robocalls. he finally researched the number online and found they were the macarthur foundation. >>> the debate over gay marriage continues in the baltimore ravens locker room. for the second time this season, a ravens player is going public with his opinion. center matt burke wrote an op ed for his paper the minneapolis "star-tribune," wrote an opinion. burke, who is a harvard grad wrote, "i hope that in voicing my beliefs i encourage people on both sides to use reason and charity as they enter this debate." ravens coach john harbaugh says he encourages the debate as long as it is respectful. >>> we've been talking about baseball and football, and now training camp begins for the wizards today. one of the team's biggest stars won't be on the court for
years of english, three years of science, math, and social science, compared to those who didn't complete a core curriculum, those who completed the core curriculum scored 144 points higher than those who did not. when we look at those who took honors courses, they scored nearly 300 points above those who did not take honors or ap courses. rigor of the academic course load in high school leads to do better on the s.a.t. and leads students to being better prepared for college. let me give you this information in terms of framing the challenge of our country faces. for every 100 ninth graders, only 70 will graduate from high school. 44 local want to college. only 30 students will enroll in the second year of college. only 21 will graduate from a four-year institution in a six- year period of time. that is not good enough to keep the united states competitive in a global economy. we are very much focused on having high expectations for all students and doing what we can to better prepare students for college success and keep those high expectations for all students coming from all
arts and sciences. here's part of the video presentation that introduced them to the emmy audience. >> they're two of the most well-recognized journalists in the united states. pioneers and advocates. for more than two decades maria and george have informed million of hispanics through the popular evening newscast. their brand of journalism is characterized not only by subjective and perspectives, but also by a high degree of social advocacy. in the last three decades both have covered a wide range of news and have witnessed history in the making. >> mexico, oh, yes. >> from presidential elections around the world to the most destructive natural disasters. maria has interviewed dictators, revolutionaries, world leaders, heads of state in latin america, and in the united states. she was among the first female journalists to report from the war torn streets of baghdad. george has covered five wars and right after the terrorists attack on september 11th he drove all the way from miami to new york to report on the tragedy firsthand. once he even asked for a vacation to cover the war in
and a professor of political science at the university of california riverside and principle investor for the national asian american survey. thank you all for being here. first of all, something richard lui mentioned in his report just a moment ago, the asian american vote is not one big voting bloc. we're talking about descendents of more than 50 countries, different cultures, different issues. how should we think about the asian american vote given that diversity? >> now, you do have all that national origin diversity, but at the same time, we do find some general patterns and trends. so generally speaking, you have about half of this population that does not identify with either party. about a third of them are undecided in terms of voting for obama or romney. but that said, they favor president obama over mitt romney by about a 2 two one ratio, generally speaking. >> christine, you've been attractiving the country speaking on the issue of the asian american vote. what would you say on the energy level? >> there's actually great energy and excitement about the elections. we've act
right by medical science, is really critical for achieving health and preventing these diseases. so the green new deal is a win/win win because it gets us to clean energy which can stop the climate crisis, jump start our economy, creating three times as many jobs as every dollar spent in the fossil fuel economy, and it puts us back to work. so it's a win/win win all around. host: dawn, joining us from oxford, alabama with dr. jill stein, last call. good morning to you. caller: good morning. i kind of agree with an awful lot of what you said about the cause of all this. but the one thing that you admitted and i'm cureuse about, what would -- kaoeurous about, what would make a banker with the subprime mortgage, what would make him -- which the whole goal is to make money, as much as he can, what would make a banker loan money to somebody that he knows was not going to be able to pay him back? and then do they just think -- get a meeting and say we're going to create these instances where we're going to loan money for people to buyouts, paopl that can't pay it back and sell it to someb
to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >> announcer: broadcasting across the nation on your radio and on current tv, this is the "bill press show." now filling in for bill, here's john fuglesang. >> john: i have the best ring in town. if you call me during the show, will you hear the coolest ring tone. >> is that right? joan the pop song of the past four years that makes the coolest possible ring tone. >> i'm tempted to call you. >> john: i will have to share it. everyone will steal it. when you have a pop song come out of your phone, it is usually jarring. i found the perfect one. it is the rolling stones. this is the "bill press show." you have to guess which show. i'm john fuglesang filling in for bill all morning long. we're taking your calls. apparent there is a debate tomorrow. i wish the media would talk about this a little bit. i've never seen the media talk about something that hasn't happened yet more than they talk about the stuff
proposals. i'm asking -- >> 100,000 new math and science teachers. we need that. >> that's a goal, right? >> educating training 2 million new workers in our community colleges in conjunction with business to fill jobs that are open right now. boosting american manufacturing by ending the tax break that sends jobs overseas and giving tax incentives to companies that start manufacturing businesses here. these are specific tangible proposals and i believe they will pass because i believe the american people are supportive of that. >> but they haven't passed. >> the verdict will be rendered november 6. megyn: joining me now mark hannah, former aid to john kerry and barack obama. kevin, your chots on that exchange? >> that was a revealing look inside the best talking points that president obama has by his top spokesperson on the campaign frame beside himself. if you can't get more prekay tough than education, green energy, research and development, and that's the solutions? those are the pin points for solutions you are offering for an election that's going to be decided on an economy and job
. there is some corals that live for many thousands of yeernz we found through some of the science we do we can drill holes down to the center of the corals and look at annual growth rings and we can look at when, in fact, when the first agriculture in australia happened, we saw a change in the type of chemistry that the annual growth rings and coral were depositing. so we have seen a chronology of increased siltation, of increased fertilization, of
on this one. you think of people like steve balmer, jim cramer. >> but there is science behind this. >> more testosterone. >> it's the testosterone that kills the hair. you're more aggressive. you're an aggressor. >> how do you keep your hair? >> if zucker was still -- i would be nicer, he has a full head of hair so i'm not afraid right now. if some guy who is unfortunately is bald happens to end up in a powerful position, it's not because of being bald, it's in spite of being bald. toupees look like crap. you can't buy a decent toupee. >> rarely bald anymore. maybe works in business, not in politics, i don't know. kong. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 after that, it's on to germany. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 then tonight, i'm trading 9500 miles away in japan. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 with the new global account from schwab, tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 i hunt down opportunities around the world tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 as if i'm right there. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and i'm in total control because i can trade tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 directly online in 12 markets in their local currencies. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 i use their global
moderator. jenna: like him on that. gregg: let's recruit him. sounds like something out of science fiction but scientists say they developed medical devices that dissolve safely inside the body. we'll have that story coming up or annuity over 10 or even 20 years? call imperial structured settlements. the experts at imperial can convert your long-term payout into a lump sum of cash today. jenna: some very interesting medical news for you. scientists say they have developed medical devices that do the work they're designed for on side your body and then, just dissolve. what happens to them? that is the question we have for dr. ernest patty, senior attending physician at st. barna bass hospital in the bronx. doctor, what are we talking about here? medical devices that dissolve, come on. >> small electronic devices. call them transient electronics made out of silicon and magnesium. they're covered in a silk cocoon. they use the silk because the silk is absorbed by the body as well as silicon and magnesium. jenna: what is scenario where someone may have a medical device you're describing? >> th
the most government funded research fop push out the boundary of science and technology our best innovators and entrepreneurs can pluck them and start the new company. it you think about that as the formula for success an education we now -- well, roughly 30% of high schools drop out of high school. we used to lead the world in college graduates coming to high school. we no longer do that. on infrastructure, according to american society of civil engineers we're $2 trillion in deficit in terms of infrastructure. immigration, we have a policy now that basically says here come here get a great education and get the hell of our country. we are fighting on the simplest h1b issues that are vital phenomena the future strength. fourth the rules for incentive risk taking and recklessness. i don't think we have em i didded to the degree we want. on government funded research if you see in the gap it looks like ekg heading for heart attack. i don't know relative to what all i know in terms of the things that historically made us great, on each one of those, i see us not going in the direction we shou
to recruit 100,000 new math and science teachers to train to make sure our young people have -- to make sure our young people have the skills that they need. we got to train 2 million workers at community colleges to bring down college tuition cost s. we got to cut our oil imports in half and create thousands of new jobs and energy. we got to use the savings from ending the war in iraq and afghanistan, to pay down our deficit. put some people to work, doing some nation building right here at home. that's the agenda we need. that's how you strengthen the middle class. that's how you keep moving forward. that's the choice in this election. that's why i'm asking for your vote. now, my opponent, he's doing a lot of -- a little tap dance at the debate the other night. trying to wiggle out of stuff he's been saying for years. doing like a -- like "dancing with the stars." or maybe it was "extreme makeover." debate edition. but no matter what he says, my opponent, he's a big believer of the top downeconomics. he thinks if we spend another $5 trillion on tax cuts that favor the althiest, we get rid
of science fiction. but it is quite, quite real. take a look at this. this is an ear that doctors at johns hopkins grew on the arm of a cancer patient. an ear growing on an arm. senior medical correspondent elizabeth cohen joins us now live from atlanta. elizabeth, we've been looking at this picture all morning. explain it to me. what's going on here? >> john, i don't know if you saw it, i went like this, still even though i've seen it so many times. it's such an eye-popping image. what's going on here is that a woman named sherry walter had cancer, skin cancer on her ear, and they needed to remove almost all of her outer ear. plus some of the structures that were inside because the cancer had spread. and so what they did was they thought, wow, i wonder if we could grow her an ear. they took some cartilage from her ribs and fashioned it into the shape of an ear, but this doesn't look like the real ear, it needed skin. so they put the cartilage that was shaped into an ear under her arm and they waited four months. the skin grew over it. they took it out, and they put it on her head and she
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 56 (some duplicates have been removed)